Beneficiaries

Agriculture

Agriculture

Agriculture has been identified as one of the four pillars of the Queensland economy in the Queensland Government’s State Planning Policy 2014. Local governments when preparing or amending local planning instruments must take into account the preservation of farmland as a State Interest. Read more

Biodiversity - the key to all the benefits we receive from natural assets

Biodiversity - the key to all the benefits we receive from natural assets

SEQ communities live in one of the most species-rich and diverse parts of Australia and the world. The region is home to around 5,000 native plant species and 900 native animal species (of which about 590 are forest dwellers). SEQ contains 149 classified and identified vegetation communities with unique characteristics known as Regional Ecosystems. These include 84 eucalypt forest ecosystems and 32 rainforest and vine thicket ecosystems. Read more

Buffering the community from extreme weather events

Buffering the community from extreme weather events

Queensland has recently experienced a series of extreme events starting in 2001 with the Millennium Drought followed by floods and storm surges in 2011 and 2013. These events provide an opportunity to plan for potential future impacts and the variability in climate.  Understanding the future likelihood of these events and applying the lessons learnt is a key strategy for enhancing the strength and resilience of the community, economy and environment. Read more

Commerce and Industry

Commerce and Industry

Natural asset management provides the raw materials for industry and influences much of and commerce sector in a variety of ways. Read more

Community capacity and awareness is critical for maintaining the assets that provide these benefits

Community capacity and awareness is critical for maintaining the assets that provide these benefits

SEQ has over half of the State’s volunteers (420,947 of the State’s 645,543 volunteers) with 19% of the population taking part in natural resource management activities as volunteers. Many of these work together in the 96 registered natural asset management groups in SEQ. These groups often coordinate and support land managers to undertake activity at local and regional scales. Read more

Community Health and Wellbeing

Community Health and Wellbeing

Natural Assets are a major determinant of human health and lifestyles.

The quality of life and the health of Australians is underpinned by having clean water and air, safe food and housing, protection from pollutants and the means to intervene in the environment to prevent and control disease.

Exposure to natural assets is also associated with reduced negative emotions and better energy levels, attention span and feelings of tranquillity compared with being in synthetic settings. There are also wider non-physical potential benefits of greenspace, such as promoting social cohesion by providing areas for people to participate in group activities. Read more

Education

Education

Natural assets attract students and educators to SEQ while also providing unique experiences to interact with natural systems as part of the learning experience. Read more

Fisheries

Fisheries

By volume and value per unit area, Moreton Bay region is the most important commercial fishery in the state. Recreational fishing is also one of the most economically and socially important leisure activities in SEQ involving people from all parts of society. Read more

Tourism

Tourism

Queensland has world class natural assets that attract tourists in great numbers. Natural beauty and pristine wilderness will hold greater value to tourists of the future. Effective management and promotion of natural assets will help Queensland to fetch a price premium in global tourist markets. Read more

Water Treatment

Water Treatment

It is estimated the current cost of treating water for drinking in SEQ is around $42 million per annum.

The cost of water treatment is impacted by the health of natural assets. High sediment loads such as those that occurred during the SEQ floods of 2011 and 2013 can threaten the short term supply of drinking water to Brisbane. Read more